October 27 2020 | Last Update on 09/04/2020 08:54:46
Sitemap | Support succoacido.net | Feed Rss |
Sei stato registrato come ospite. ( Accedi | registrati )
Ci sono 2 altri utenti online (-1 registrati, 3 ospiti). 
SuccoAcido.net
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Latest | Arts | Environments | Art Places | Art Knowledges | Art Festivals | Reviews | Biblio | Web-Gallery | News | Links
Art - Art Places - Article | by Costanza Meli in Art - Art Places on 08/03/2012 - Comments (0)
 
 
 
The small Museum of Migrations in Lampedusa

The Museum of Migrations could be a first piece to lead Lampedusa’s development along a purposeful path, instead of leaving it to randomness: it could be an example to the whole world, seeing integration as an inevitable, but nonetheless rightful resource within Italy’s multicultural present. In thirty years the sons, daughters, grandchildren, brothers and sisters of those. We now call clandestines will be fullfledged Italian and European citizens. It is our duty to keep track of these migrations, which would otherwise be totally forgotten; it is our duty to save these ships, these Korans, these Bibles, these clothes and shoes, documents and objects the sea has brought us. They will speak – they already do – to our posterity: they will tell of these tragedies, these hopes and dreams so often drowned in the Mediterranean sea.

 
 

If we consider the museum as an institution, we spontaneously relate it to concepts such as collection, scientific committee, administration, more or less codified cultural representation, more or less marked cultural policies, dialogue with its context and search for a public. If we refer to the internal debate within contemporary museums, we immediately think of integration and cultural mediation, alongside the debate concerning their public and social function and the educational departments’ research. All this plays a big role in the mental image shared by art historians, anthropologists and curators researching hybridisation and crossbreeding, and what these notions could mean within the various discourses on identity, on the one hand, and self-representations of otherness on the other hand.
But what is happening today in Lampedusa? Who are the main characters in this story? Who gathered this collection, and what does it include? What do these findings and traces have to tell? Which identity, which otherness?
We are about to talk of memory and of its strange, unexpected connotations.
We are about to talk of the population of Lampedusa: common and special people who started, from a grassroots level, the construction of a collective and individual memory, keeping clear of any conventional narrative and of dominant discursive structures.
We could shed some light on our museum’s protagonists. Askavusa is a cultural association, a group of friends. Giacomo Sferlazzo is a poet, singer and artist who started gathering objects and things he found – wooden scraps from wrecked or dismantled ships – in Lampedusa, with his association.
Often saving materials otherwise doomed to destruction, abandonment, scrapyards.
Askavusa is among the subjects who did the most, over the past few years, to help the thousands of young women, men and children who decided to embark on the desperate journey out of wars and poverty, towards Europe, Italy, Sicily, Lampedusa.
I looked at, and listened to, the protagonists of this story; I had long discussions with Giacomo Sferlazzo, to understand what reality these kids were facing, often with other volunteer or humanitarian organisations, dealing with emergencies or even with the daily arrival of migrants, who cross the Mediterranean hoping to find a new beginning in this first patch of Europe, Lampedusa.
Over my conversation with the Askavusa volunteers I discovered a whole world of solidarity and civic engagement, great humility alongside a deep awareness of one’s role, of the importance of collective action and testimony.

I asked Giacomo why he started hunting out and preserving those ships, Korans, Bibles, letters, travel amulets, clothes, personal belongings now representing the only trace of thousands of different people: lives which nobody knows and which the media portray as an undifferentiated mass. I discovered that the quest for memory is an individual journey, starting from oneself, one’s own roots, and gradually becoming an encounter with the other.

GS: The first time I went to the boat cemetery, I was looking – as is often the case – for something wonderful in the junkyard. I have always been extremely curious of objects, I remember my grandparents’ living rooms, so many things in their cupboards – each with a story or a memory of its own: most were ugly, but still I was extremely fascinated. They had been there forever, every now and then a new one would appear, they all seemed extremely valuable to me. But as I grew up many of those objects would change places or end up in some cardboard box. I saw things materialise and vanish in those homes at an ever increasing pace, I don’t know if it was my ageing which had made time and space change forever, if some magic halo around those things had gone for good, or if – as I would have later said – ‘objects started being designed to become trash as soon as possible, goods to be replaced at the fastest imaginable pace’. I remember when immigration hadn’t yet altered Lampedusa’s face, and I would roam the island’s junkyard as if on a treasure hunt, among those forms, materials and stories all intertwined with my fantasies, eventually bringing me back to my own childhood and the quest for the invisible I never got tired of. I often found things, or just played within an abandoned car, driving it on desert trails or flying it among washing machines and brightly coloured tiles.
But when I first found, in a heap of chunks of wood, a bundle of pictures, letters and holy scriptures, I felt something I had never experienced during my trips through discarded objects. It was as if I had found something I had always been looking for, a testimony to something human that had previously been shrouded in mysteries, perhaps mystery itself.
It was as if I had just taken part in the story of humanity as a whole, as if I had discovered the Egyptian pyramids, as if I had started on a path leading to a promise of light and liberation but winding through injustice and pain.

This is how a new approach to memory and identity has taken shape from the experiences of Giacomo Sferlazzo and Associazione Askavusa, which has been supporting him in this research, and mission, for a few years now. What immediately struck me in his project was that it was brought about by common people – not by institutions – who suddenly felt very strongly the meaning at the root of the process of musealisation itself. I wondered why a group of kids, the population of an island so often forgotten or martyred, has felt the need to make a museum out of what they found.

What is this need for storytelling and witnessing, this search for an identity that can only be found through a dialogue with the memories of other populations, other people travelling and passing through here? What can this memory – born out of the encounter between different stories and narratives – represent?

GS: The Museum of Migrations could be a first piece to lead Lampedusa’s development along a purposeful path, instead of leaving it to randomness: it could be an example to the whole world, seeing integration as an inevitable, but nonetheless rightful resource within Italy’s multicultural present. In thirty years the sons, daughters, grandchildren, brothers and sisters of those we now call clandestines will be fullfledged Italian and European citizens. It is our duty to keep track of these migrations, which would otherwise be totally forgotten; it is our duty to save these ships, these Korans, these Bibles, these clothes and shoes, documents and objects the sea has brought us. They will speak – they already do – to our posterity: they will tell of these tragedies, these hopes and dreams so often drowned in the Mediterranean sea.

 
Il piccolo Museo delle Migrazioni di Lampedusa

Il museo delle migrazioni può essere un primo tassello, per portare lo sviluppo dell’isola di Lampedusa su un percorso voluto e non casuale, su un percorso che può essere un esempio per il mondo intero, individuando nell’integrazione una risorsa non solo giusta ma inevitabile, visto il processo multiculturale che l’Italia sta vivendo. Nell’arco di un trentennio i figli, i nipoti, i fratelli e le sorelle di chi oggi è ritenuto clandestino, saranno, a pieno titolo, cittadini italiani, europei. Noi abbiamo il dovere di conservare le testimonianze di questi movimenti migratori, che altrimenti rischiano di cadere nel dimenticatoio, abbiamo il dovere di salvare almeno le barche, i corani e le bibbie, i vestiti, le scarpe, i documenti e gli altri piccoli oggetti che il mare ci ha restituito e che parlano e parleranno ai posteri di queste tragedie, di queste speranze, di questi sogni che spesso soffocano nei fondali del Mediterraneo
.

 
 

Se consideriamo il museo come un’istituzione ci sembra naturale immaginare correlati di senso come una  una collezione, un comitato scientifico, una struttura amministrativa, una rappresentazione culturale più o meno codificata, una politica culturale più o meno connotata, la ricerca di un pubblico.
Se ci riferiamo al dibattito interno alle istituzioni museali contemporanee, ci vengono in mente le pratiche di integrazione e di mediazione culturale, le riflessioni sulla loro funzione pubblica e sociale e le ricerche dei dipartimenti di didattica.
Tutto questo è certamente presente anche nell’immaginario degli storici dell’arte e degli antropologi, dei curatori e dei ricercatori che ragionano sulle dinamiche di ibridazione e meticciato che connotano la realtà contemporanea e sul risvolto che questi concetti assumono rispetto ai diversi discorsi sull’identità e alle pratiche di rappresentazione dell’alterità.
Ma cosa sta succedendo da qualche anno a Lampedusa? Chi sono i protagonisti di questa storia? Chi ha messo in piedi questa collezione e di che oggetti è composta? Cosa raccontano i reperti e le tracce raccolte? Quale identità e quale alterità? Stiamo per parlare di memoria e delle strane e inaspettate connotazioni di questa parola.
Parliamo degli abitanti di Lampedusa, persone comuni e speciali che, dal basso, hanno cominciato un percorso di costruzione di una memoria collettiva e individuale al tempo stesso, fori da qualsiasi narrazione convenzionale e dalle strutture discorsive dominanti.
Facciamo luce sui protagonisti del nostro museo. Askavusa è un’associazione culturale, un gruppo di amici. Giacomo Sferlazzo è un poeta, un cantautore, un artista che a Lampedusa, con la sua associazione, ha cominciato qualche anno fa a raccogliere gli oggetti, i pezzi di legno, i relitti delle barche naufragate o smantellate; i materiali che trovava sulla spiaggia. Spesso salvando questi materiali ormai destinati alla distruzione e abbandonati nelle discariche.
Askavusa è uno dei soggetti che più si sono impegnati in questi anni per fornire assistenza e aiuto alle migliaia di giovani, donne, bambini, uomini, che hanno deciso di affrontare un viaggio disperato sulle barche che li avrebbero potuti condurre in salvo dalle guerre e dalla povertà, in Europa, in Italia, in Sicilia, a Lampedusa.
Ho ascoltato e osservato i protagonisti di questo racconto, ho discusso a lungo con Giacomo Sferlazzo, per capire quale realtà stessero affrontando questi ragazzi, spesso in compagnia di altre associazioni di volontariato o organizzazioni umanitarie, per far fronte a momenti di emergenza o al consueto approdo di migranti che attraversando il Mediterraneo e arrivano a Lampedusa, riconoscendovi un lembo d’Europa, un nuovo inizio. 
In questi dialoghi con i ragazzi di Askavusa ho scoperto un mondo di solidarietà e impegno civile, ho trovato una grande umiltà e, al tempo stesso, la consapevolezza del proprio ruolo, dell’importanza dell’azione collettiva, e della testimonianza.


Ho chiesto a Giacomo il motivo che l’ha spinto a cercare e a conservare relitti dei barconi, corani, bibbie, lettere alle famiglie, amuleti di viaggio, abiti, effetti personali che rappresentano l’unica traccia rimasta di migliaia di persone e di vite diverse che nessuno conosce e che i mezzi d’informazione ci restituiscono come una massa indifferenziata. La ricerca della memoria, ho scoperto qui, è un percorso individuale che comincia da sé e dalle proprie radici, e si trasforma nell’incontro con l’altro.

GS:La prima volta che andai al cimitero delle barche, stavo cercando, come spesso mi capitava fare, qualcosa che mi stupisse, nella spazzatura. Ho sempre avuto una curiosità nei confronti degli oggetti, ricordo i saloni dei miei nonni pieni di cose nelle credenze, tutti avevano una storia, si trascinavano dietro un ricordo, molti non erano belli, ma esercitavano su di me un fascino particolare, ed erano lì da sempre, ogni tanto se ne aggiungeva qualcuno, a me sembravano tutte cose di molto valore. Poi io crescevo e molti oggetti cambiavano posto o venivano conservati in qualche scatolone. Con maggiore velocità, vedevo oggetti comparire in casa per scomparire molto presto, non so se ero cresciuto io e il tempo e lo spazio erano mutati per sempre, se davvero era scomparsa quella magia attorno le cose o, come dopo poco avrei letto, “gli oggetti cominciavano ad essere progettati per diventare prima possibile rifiuti, merce da sostituire con maggior velocità possibile”. Ricordo che quando ancora l'immigrazione non aveva cambiato il volto di Lampedusa mi aggiravo nella discarica dell'isola cercando come un tesoro, tutte quelle forme, quei materiali, quelle storie che s’intrecciavano con la mia fantasia e mi riportavano alla mia infanzia, a quella caccia dell'invisibile che mi portavo dietro da sempre; spesso trovavo cose o semplicemente giocavo dentro qualche macchina sfasciata, guidando in strade desertiche o addirittura volando tra lavatrici e mattonelle colorate. Ma, quando per la prima volta trovai, tra cumuli di legni tritati, un pacchetto con lettere, foto e testi sacri, nessuna sensazione che avevo provato nei miei viaggi tra le cose buttate, fu paragonabile. Era come avere trovato quello che per molto avevo cercato, avevo trovato la testimonianza di un’umanità avvolta nel mistero della vita e forse il mistero stesso. Fu come essere partecipe della storia dell'umanità tutta, fu come avere scoperto le piramidi d'Egitto, come incamminarsi per una strada che alla fine ha una promessa di luce e liberazione ma che, mentre la si percorre, è intrisa di dolore e ingiustizia.

Costanza Meli: Ecco che un nuovo approccio alla memoria e all’identità prende forma nell’esperienza di Giacomo e dell’Associazione Askavusa, che lo accompagna in questa ricerca e in questa missione da qualche anno. 
Ciò che mi ha da subito colpito è che fossero delle persone comuni, non un ente, non un’istituzione, non un collezionista a percepire con forza il senso che sottende il processo stesso di musealizzazione.
Mi chiedevo: perché dei ragazzi, la popolazione di un’isola così martoriata e così spesso dimenticata, hanno sentito la necessità di musealizzare ciò che hanno trovato?
Cos’è questo bisogno che è insito al racconto, alla testimonianza, alla ricerca dell’identità e che si realizza nel confronto con la memoria di altri popoli, altre genti, che viaggiano e che passano? Cosa può rappresentare questa memoria che si dà nell’incontro tra storie e racconti diversi?


Giacomo mi ha risposto così:


GS: Il museo delle migrazioni può essere un primo tassello, per portare lo sviluppo dell’isola di Lampedusa su un percorso voluto e non casuale, su un percorso che può essere un esempio per il mondo intero, individuando nell’integrazione una risorsa non solo giusta ma inevitabile, visto il processo multiculturale che l’Italia sta vivendo. Nell’arco di un trentennio i figli, i nipoti, i fratelli e le sorelle di chi oggi è ritenuto clandestino, saranno, a pieno titolo, cittadini italiani, europei. Noi abbiamo il dovere di conservare le testimonianze di questi movimenti migratori, che altrimenti rischiano di cadere nel dimenticatoio, abbiamo il dovere di salvare almeno le barche, i corani e le bibbie, i vestiti, le scarpe, i documenti e gli altri piccoli oggetti che il mare ci ha restituito e che parlano e parleranno ai posteri di queste tragedie, di queste speranze, di questi sogni che spesso soffocano nei fondali del Mediterraneo
.

 


© 2001, 2014 SuccoAcido - All Rights Reserved
Reg. Court of Palermo (Italy) n°21, 19.10.2001
All images, photographs and illustrations are copyright of respective authors.
Copyright in Italy and abroad is held by the publisher Edizioni De Dieux or by freelance contributors. Edizioni De Dieux does not necessarily share the views expressed from respective contributors.

Bibliography, links, notes:

This article is a collaboration between SuccoAcido and Fucking Good Art project who will publish this
article in both English and Italian.

Pen: G. Costanza Meli
English Version: Vincenzo Latronico.
Link: www.fuckinggoodart.nl/

 
 
  Register to post comments 
  Other articles in archive from Costanza Meli 
  Send it to a friend
  Printable version


To subscribe and receive 4 SuccoAcido issues
onpaper >>>

To distribute in your city SuccoAcido onpaper >>>

To submit articles in SuccoAcido magazine >>>

 
Courtesy of Askavusa Association
............................................................................................
Courtesy of Askavusa Association
............................................................................................
Courtesy of Askavusa Association
............................................................................................
Courtesy of Askavusa Association
............................................................................................
FRIENDS

Your control panel.
 
Old Admin control not available
waiting new website
in the next days...
Please be patience.
It will be available as soon as possibile, thanks.
De Dieux /\ SuccoAcido

SuccoAcido #3 .:. Summer 2013
 
SA onpaper .:. back issues
 

Today's SuccoAcido Users.
 
Today's News.
 
Succoacido Manifesto.
 
SuccoAcido Home Pages.
 

Art >>>

Cinema >>>

Comics >>>

Music >>>

Theatre >>>

Writing >>>

Editorials >>>

Editorials.
 
EDIZIONI DE DIEUX
Today's Links.
 
FRIENDS
SuccoAcido Back Issues.
 
Projects.
 
SuccoAcido Newsletter.
 
SUCCOACIDO COMMUNITY
Contributors.
 
Contacts.
 
Latest SuccoAcido Users.
 
De Dieux/\SuccoAcido records.
 
Stats.
 
today's users
today's page view
view complete stats
BECOME A DISTRIBUTOR
SuccoAcido Social.