September 22 2020 | Last Update on 09/04/2020 08:54:46
Sitemap | Support succoacido.net | Feed Rss |
Sei stato registrato come ospite. ( Accedi | registrati )
Ci sono 0 altri utenti online (-1 registrati, 1 ospite). 
SuccoAcido.net
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Latest | Musicians | Music Labels | Focus | Music Festivals | CD Reviews | Live Reports | Charts | Biblio | News | Links
Music - Musicians - Interview | by SuccoAcido in Music - Musicians on 30/07/2011 - Comments (0)

 
 
 
Madeleine Bloom

If the mark of a true poet is the ability to reveal the world and reality by using ordinary means in an extraordinary way, then Madeleine Bloom is a poet through and through.
Born and raised in Jena – former DDR – she now lives in Berlin, in a Friedrichshain flat that she dubbed her “ivory tower”, surrounded by a paraphernalia of musical instruments, electronics and recording devices.
In 2009 she self-produced and released her first album, “Minutia”: a stunning collection of impassioned songs and cinematic soundscapes that’s also a testament to Madeleine’s musical craftsmanship along with her uncanny talent for weaving everyday sounds into the most unusual and fascinating sound architectures.
Succoacido had the chance for a little chat with her right before her Sicilian mini-tour.

 
 

If the mark of a true poet is the ability to reveal the world and reality by using ordinary means in an extraordinary way, then Madeleine Bloom is a poet through and through.
Born and raised in Jena – former DDR – she now lives in Berlin, in a Friedrichshain flat that she dubbed her “ivory tower”, surrounded by a paraphernalia of musical instruments, electronics and recording devices.
In 2009 she self-produced and released her first album, “Minutia”: a stunning collection of impassioned songs and cinematic soundscapes that’s also a testament to Madeleine’s musical craftsmanship along with her uncanny talent for weaving everyday sounds into the most unusual and fascinating sound architectures.
Succoacido had the chance for a little chat with her right before her Sicilian mini-tour.


SA. For many of us, the “Eastern Block” – especially in its twilight years - is somewhat of a mythical (and often stereotypical) entity ingrained in our distant memories and imagination. What was it like to grow up there, musically? Was there an underground/avant-garde scene? Is there anything you actually miss from that time?

MB. My parents were true music fans, especially my dad. They mostly listened to "western", often slightly leftfield, pop/rock music. When I was born they only had a studio apartment and discovered that playing me music on headphones would soothe me. There are some albums that always make me feel very small all of a sudden. Later I loved going through their record collection and listen to albums on headphones to catch every little detail. I loved Pink Floyd, The Beatles, The Kinks and Peter Gabriel. I remember my dad sitting in front of the stereo, recording tapes over tapes from the radio; songs that you couldn't buy. I think a lot the records my parents had in their collection were pretty hard to get, but getting music had the thrill of the hunt. It was exciting. My dad shared that with me, even let me play records as soon as I could reach the turntable. I started making my own tapes, listening for hours on the radio and taping songs I liked. Those are my most vivid memories. Sure, there were also Russian songs you had to sing at school. And then there was the classical music I learnt to play in my guitar lessons. These days I miss the thrill of the hunt, most of all. The anticipation until you get your hands on a new album. That has more to do with the development in technology though, especially the internet. Everything only a few mouse clicks away. Another thing I miss from that time is not being constantly bombarded with advertising, and the peace and quiet you got for your own thoughts and words.

SA. One of the things that distinctively define you as a musician is your DIY approach. How did you get there? And care to share something about the good, the ugly and the challenging of the whole process?

MB. These days it is much easier to do things yourself. There are many sites and services on the internet helping you to get your music out there. I studied media design and electro-acoustic music, so I can do my own designs, websites and videos and also produce my music. With the technology avaliable today, setting up a decent home studio doesn't cost the world anymore. In a way, one thing just led to another. Availability and necessity. I play concerts solo, as a modern one woman band, recording layers to create a full sound. I always liked technology and I reckoned it would make it more likely that I could take this on the road if it was just me. It's taken me a long time to figure out a good way to play my songs live and by now the looping has become a part of me.
I don't believe in signing a record deal just for the sake of having a record deal; so I started my own label, Quixotica Records. A lot of deals are terrible for the artist, but up until a few years ago you had to play by the rules or you could not release music. Now you can make up your own rules and only take a deal that feels right. This means you have control over everything and can decide yourself how things are done, but you have to do them yourself. It's great for me to have the artistic freedom because no one can tell me to change aspects of my music or how my image should be. On the other hand, there's a lot of work that comes with it... booking, promotion and PR, designs, emails, contracts etc. Some of those things I really don't like doing and it can be a lonely chore sometimes, but they come with the territory. I prefer it to being told I have to use 'normal' beats and write generic pop songs. I could have had that, but it felt wrong.

SA. Let’s talk about “Minutia” a little. The title, the lyrics, even the packaging suggests a sort of “minimalistic impressionism” yet your sound architecture and musical imagery is extremely luscious, layered and sophisticated, cinematic almost. What’s up with that?

MB. For me it doesn't seem contrary at all. It's a very organic process for me how I write songs. I quite often already have lyrics as I try to get them down once something moves me to put it into words. Then I either tailor-write the music for it or I come up with an idea and see which lyrics would work with it. Writing the lyrics last has proven to be very difficult. As for the beats, I record sounds that fit the theme either literally or associatively, i.e. paper being crumpled or torn as in Paperheart. The initial musical idea is often just a sketch I work on until I find the music fits the mood of the song. So in the end the music has all the little everyday sounds layered and mixed with the emotional instrumentation to paint the full picture. It's about the small things in life that often get overlooked, but can be extremely enriching and yes, it is all impressions, snapshots of moments, moods. I'm a synaesthete so I compose a lot by colours and I tried to reflect this in the cover layout of 'Minutia'.

SA. Since we mentioned lyrics – which range from raw to quirky but are always deeply candid and personal in any case - and we’ve kind of touched upon your synesthetic approach to music composition, what else can you share about how the two things get together?

MB. I guess it all comes from the way I approach music as a listener. Music needs to touch me emotionally somehow. This is exactly what I'm trying to express in my songs. And the most emotional things usually are very personal. There's so many different emotions and depending on the lyrics I write and arrange the songs so they convey these feelings. In that sense, I compose the music as if it was a soundtrack so that even if you don't understand the lyrics it still translates. I think emotions are so much easier to express in music than words. They're supposed to tell the story, but at the same time stay vague enough for personal interpretation and identification.

SA. Succoacido is all about “crossing languages”, and defining your approach to music composition as “synesthetic” just reminded me of something I’ve been meaning to ask you for a while: would you name a few artists (writers, photographers, filmmakers, architects etc… just NOT musicians) whom you’d say have influenced and /or inspired your style as a composer? And how?


MB. Charlie Chaplin was a huge inspiration for me as a kid. I love how in slapstick and other silent movies they manage to get the story and emotions across with little to no words. Murnau is one of my favourite directors of this time. Salman Rushdie directly inspired the lyrics to 'Unspoken', the fairytale aspect and descriptiveness of his writing. The Impressionists showed me that you can capture moments. Gaudi his richness of detail and colours. Just to name some. I reckon everything I take interest in inspires me in some way or another.

SA. And what about the musicians? Aside from the obvious (and I mean “obvious” in the best possible way) connections such as Bjork, Lamb, Kate Bush, Imogen Heap, who else would you put among your inspirations and influences?

MB. Patrick Watson & The Wooden Arms, Radiohead, lots of Warp Records artists, in particular Plaid and Aphex Twin, the Modernist composers, electroacoustic composers like Page or Stockhausen through my studies, the classical music I played in my guitar lessons as a child.

SA. Own up! What’s the skeleton in the closet, in your record collection? Mine would have to be The RAH Band’s “Clouds Across the Moon”, methinks…

I’m not embarrassed about anything I bought, I think. Not even for the short stint in being a New Kids on the Block fan… was an experiment to see if i could fit in and be normal, but it failed!

SA. You live in Berlin, which is universally considered a trendsetting city and a sort of mecca for live music, alternative clubbing and the likes. Yet all that glitter isn’t gold and you’ve been very critical/disillusioned about the music scene yourself; what would you say Berlin has given you and what has it taken away or not provided enough of?

MB. When I moved to Berlin, I already knew people that hosted a monthly concert evening (still do), so I met a lot of musicians really fast and I played in various projects. It was inspiring and I learnt a lot. So far though I haven't found someone that shares the same musical ideas. This really surprised me. Even though Berlin has so many musicians, there are certain styles that are predominant. And if you don't fit into one of them you're somewhat on your own. Berlin is oversaturated with live music and it shows. A lot of venues want to be able to offer live music, but they don't want to spend money on a good PA or a sound guy or pay. The audience can be pretty jaded and intimidating. Once you learn how to handle it, you'll probably be alright playing anywhere though. The funny thing is, being from Berlin is useful anywhere but in Berlin.

SA. You’re very active in social media, not just using it as a promotional tool but also as a sort of shared logbook of your creative process; Italian independent musicians seem averagely a little wary still or not fully aware of the full potential of social networking as an alternative to the rotting corpse that is the old music business model. Do you have any word of advice for them? Any personal experiences you feel like sharing?

MB. What I feel is the most important is: find one or two social media networks that you feel comfortable with and concentrate mostly on those. Take your time to find your way of using them and integrating them into your daily routine. There's no point starting to tweet/post only right before your release. It's building a relationship and this will always take time.
My favourite social network is Twitter. It's quick, immediate and so versatile. I've had a lot of incredible things happen through it... getting discovered by Imogen Heap and scoring a support slot for her, having fans and fellow musicians create fantastic remixes of my songs, to finding good friends and help with a lot of different things, from the inspiration to use wiimotes as MIDI controllers to getting me to play live in Sicily.

SA. What are you expecting from your upcoming gigs in Sicily?

MB. A passionate audience (especially compared to the Berlin crowd) and good fun on stage.

SA. And, lastly, what’s your proudest accomplishment as a musician, to date?

MB. Making 'Minutia'. When I got started with the album, I had absolutely no idea if I could pull it off. I simply went for it, learnt so much in the process and it turned out pretty good I'd say. It doesn't sound like it was made in my flat with a 'blanket cave' as a vocal booth (which is very cosy, by the way).

 
Madeleine Bloom

Se il marchio di un autentico poeta è l’abilità di rivelare e raccontare la realtà usando mezzi ordinari in modo straordinario, Madeleine Bloom è poeta a pieno diritto e senza timori di smentita.
Nata e cresciuta a Jena – nella ex DDR – vive attualmente a Berlino, in un appartamento di Friedrichshain da lei ribattezzato la sua “torre d’avorio”, circondata da un armamentario di strumenti musicali e gadget elettronici.
Nel 2009 ha autoprodotto e pubblicato il suo primo album, “Minutia”: una straordinaria raccolta di vibranti canzoni intimiste e panorami sonori dal sapore cinematografico che testimonia l’eccezionale talento compositivo di Madeleine e la sua abilità nell’intrecciare sonorità quotidiane in architetture musicali insolite ed affascinanti.
Succoacido ha avuto l’opportunità di scambiare quattro chiacchiere con lei alla vigilia del suo mini-tour Siciliano

 
 

Se il marchio di un autentico poeta è l’abilità di rivelare e raccontare la realtà usando mezzi ordinari in modo straordinario, Madeleine Bloom è poeta a pieno diritto e senza timori di smentita.
Nata e cresciuta a Jena – nella ex DDR – vive attualmente a Berlino, in un appartamento di Friedrichshain da lei ribattezzato la sua “torre d’avorio”, circondata da un armamentario di strumenti musicali e gadget elettronici.
Nel 2009 ha autoprodotto e pubblicato il suo primo album, “Minutia”: una straordinaria raccolta di vibranti canzoni intimiste e panorami sonori dal sapore cinematografico che testimonia l’eccezionale talento compositivo di Madeleine e la sua abilità nell’intrecciare sonorità quotidiane in architetture musicali insolite ed affascinanti.
Succoacido ha avuto l’opportunità di scambiare quattro chiacchiere con lei alla vigilia del suo mini-tour Siciliano.

SA. Nell’immaginario di molti di noi, specie quelli della mia generazione, i “Paesi dell’Est” hanno rappresentato - nel decennio immediatamente precedente alla caduta del Muro, in particolar modo - una sorta di entità quasi mitologica, circondata da mistero e stereotipi. Com’è stato crescere lì, in quegli anni? Esisteva un’avanguardia musicale o una scena underground? C’è qualcosa che ti manca di quel periodo?

MB. I miei genitori erano entrambi appassionati di musica, specialmente mio padre. Ascoltavano moltissima musica “occidentale”, ma tutta roba decisamente alternativa e poco commerciale. Quando sono nata io erano entrambi molto giovani e vivevano in un monolocale; si accorsero ben presto che farmi ascoltare musica con le cuffie era il modo migliore per tenermi tranquilla… A tutt’oggi, ci sono degli album che solo a sentirli mi fanno ritornare immediatamente bambina. Una volta cresciuta, il mio passatempo preferito diventò ascoltare la loro collezione di dischi, sempre in cuffia per cogliere ogni minimo dettaglio. Adoravo i Pink Floyd, i Beatles, i Kinks, Peter Gabriel… Mi ricordo mio padre seduto davanti allo stereo a registrare cassette su cassette dalla radio; tutta musica che era proibito comprare. Un sacco di musica nella collezione dei miei sarebbe stata comunque difficile da trovare ma il fatto che fosse anche proibita aggiungeva un brivido in più a tutta la faccenda. A mio padre piaceva condividere tutto questo con me; mi lasciava perfino mettere dischi da sola una volta cresciuta abbastanza da arrivare al giradischi! Poi venne il mio turno di passare ore ed ore ad ascoltare la radio, registrando le canzoni che mi piacevano. Questi sono i miei ricordi più vividi.
Certo, c’erano anche le canzoni russe che ci toccava imparare e cantare a scuola. E poi la musica classica, che studiavo a lezione di chitarra.
Di quei tempi ciò che credo mi manchi di più è il brivido della caccia, se così si può dire: l’eccitazione di avere finalmente tra le mani un album che hai tanto desiderato. Croce e delizia dell’avvento di Internet, direi: oggi tutto è a portata di click. Un’altra cosa che rimpiango di quel periodo è l’assenza totale del bombardamento pubblicitario di cui siamo vittime oggi.

SA. Uno dei tuoi tratti distintivi in quanto musicista è il tuo approccio “fai da te”. Come ci sei arrivata? Illuminaci un po’, se ti va, circa il bello e il meno bello di un processo che per molti rappresenta indubbiamente una sfida.

MB. Di questi tempi è estremamente facile fare da sé. Per dirne una, Internet è piena di siti e servizi che ti consentono di pubblicare e promuovere musica autonomamente. Io ho studiato media design e musica elettroacustica all’università quindi, volendo, posso essere perfettamente autosufficiente per quanto riguarda design, packaging, siti web nonché la produzione musicale vera e propria. Con la tecnologia disponibile ultimamente, inoltre, mettere su uno studio di registrazione domestico più che decente è alla portata di tutti. Quindi, per tornare alla tua domanda, credo che sia stata una coincidenza di necessità e disponibilità.
Anche in concerto sono da sola, in un set-up da “one woman band” contemporanea in cui registro, sovrappongo e mando in loop suoni e tracce audio per creare un unico intreccio. Ho sempre amato la tecnologia ed ho pensato che avrebbe potuto rendermi più indipendente anche in un contesto dal vivo.
Mi ci è voluto un bel po’ per trovare e mettere insieme un set-up che facesse al caso mio ma adesso posso dire che il looping live è diventato parte integrante del mio stile.
Personalmente non ho mai avuto la frenesia del firmare un contratto discografico a tutti i costi, quindi ho optato per avere una mia propria etichetta: la Quixotica Records. La media dei contratti discografici è assolutamente terribile per gli artisti e fino a pochi anni fa non esistevano alternative per chi volesse pubblicare la propria musica; adesso fortunatamente le case discografiche non fanno più il bello ed il cattivo tempo e la possibilità di giocare secondo le proprie regole non è più un miraggio. Il prezzo del pieno controllo sulle proprie scelte è però il doversi occupare di tutto da soli. Avere totale libertà artistica per quanto mi riguarda è impagabile ma devo confessare che gestire direttamente tutti gli annessi e connessi (il booking, la promozione, i contratti etc.) non è esattamente la mia passione… Lo preferisco comunque mille volte alla prospettiva di essere costretta a scrivere pop radiofonico o al sentirmi dire di usare ritmi più “commerciali” nelle mie canzoni; mi sono trovata nella posizione di fare una scelta del genere e non mi è piaciuto neanche un po’.

SA. Parliamo un po’ di “Minutia”. Il titolo, i testi, finanche la copertina evocano una sorta di minimalismo impressionista, eppure il tuo universo sonoro è estremamente strutturato, ricco, lussureggiante; quasi cinematografico a livello di immaginario.

MB. Per me le due cose non sono affatto in contraddizione. Il modo in cui compongo è un processo molto organico; a volte capita che io abbia un frammento di testo che poi sviluppo e sul quale costruisco un universo musicale, e a volte il percorso è esattamente all’inverso. Scrivere testi si è rivelata per me la cosa più impegnativa. Quanto ai ritmi, in genere registro dei suoni che si adattano al tema sia per associazione che in modo letterale (per esempio la carta accartocciata o lacerata in “Paperheart”). Alla fine ogni brano ha tutta una serie di suoni “quotidiani” sovrapposti e mixati alla strumentazione più tradizionale ed emotiva, a comporre il quadro complessivo. Il concetto alla base di tutto è che la vita, così come la sua espressione artistica, è fatta di piccole cose che spesso trascuriamo ma che insieme compongono un quadro estremamente ricco ed appagante. E sì, la cifra complessiva è determinata da impressioni, stati d’animo, istantanee. Quanto alla copertina di “Minutia”, credo rifletta il fatto che sono una sinesteta e che, nella composizione musicale, spesso vado per colori…

SA. Effettivamente i tuoi testi spaziano dal doloroso al bizzarro ma sono sempre estremamente sinceri e personali; che altro ci puoi dire su come si integrano nella “composizione sinestetica”?


MB. Credo che abbia molto a che fare col modo in cui approccio la musica da ascoltatrice. Bisogna che la musica mi tocchi a livello emotivo, in qualche modo, ed è esattamente lo stesso effetto che cerco di ottenere io con le mie canzoni. E le cose che toccano di più a livello emotivo sono normalmente le più personali e meno filtrate. La musica riesce molto meglio di qualunque altro mezzo espressivo a veicolare questo tipo di immediatezza emozionale e, in questo senso, cerco di comporre come se avessi a che fare con una colonna sonora: raccontando una storia attraverso la musica che consenta interpretazione ed identificazione anche senza necessariamente comprendere i testi.

SA. Considerato che il claim di Succoacido è “crossing languages”, tutto questo parlare di sinestesia mi fa sorgere spontanea la prossima domanda: ci faresti alcuni nomi di artisti, rigorosamente NON musicisti (scrittori, fotografi, filmmaker, architetti, etc), che hanno influenzato – ed in quale modo - il tuo stile musicale?

MB. Charlie Chaplin è stato per me una grandissima fonte di ispirazione, sin da quando ero bambina. Amo il modo in cui i film muti riescono a comunicare in modo universale ed immediato senza bisogno di dialoghi e senza risentire del passare del tempo; Murnau è un altro esempio eccezionale dei registi di quel periodo. Salman Rushdie ha ispirato direttamente il testo di “Unspoken”, sia l’aspetto fiabesco che la descrittività. Gli Impressionisti mi hanno insegnato che anche i momenti più effimeri possono essere catturati. Gaudí mi ha spinta a ricercare la ricchezza nei dettagli e colori. E questi sono solo i primi nomi che mi vengono in mente. Credo che, in definitiva, tutto ciò che mi interessa finisca per ispirarmi ed influenzarmi in un modo o nell’altro.

SA. E che mi dici dei musicisti? A parte le evidenti “parentele” (nel miglior senso possibile) con Bjork, Lamb, Kate Bush e Imogen Heap, chi altri metteresti nel novero delle tue maggiori influenze?

MB. Patrick Watson & The Wooden Arms, i Radiohead, un bel po’ di artisti della Warp Records – specialmente Plaid ed Aphex Twin - e poi Page, Stockhausen, i Modernisti e i compositori che studiavo da piccola a lezione di chitarra classica…

SA. Ok, tempo di confessioni! Fuori il nome dello scheletro nell’armadio della tua collezione di dischi… (il mio mi sa che è “Clouds Across the Moon” della RAH Band…)

MB. Non rinnego nulla di tutto ciò che ho comprato di tasca mia! Nemmeno il mio (brevissimo) interludio da fan dei New Kids On The Block… più che altro è stato un esperimento di normalità e conformismo. Miseramente fallito, va da sé!

SA. Abiti a Berlino, città universalmente considerata punto di riferimento per le nuove tendenze e per la musica dal vivo. Eppure non è tutto oro ciò che luccica e tu stessa ti sei dichiarata molto critica e disincantata soprattutto rispetto alla scena musicale e dei club; cosa pensi ti abbia dato Berlino, e cosa ti ha tolto o semplicemente non dato a sufficienza?

MB. Quando mi sono trasferita a Berlino conoscevo già diversa gente tra cui gli organizzatori di un evento mensile live piuttosto frequentato; in questo modo ho avuto l’opportunità di incontrare già da subito parecchi musicisti, e di partecipare a molti progetti live ed in studio. È stato assai stimolante ed ho imparato tantissimo. Nonostante tutto, non mi è ancora riuscito di incontrare nessuno che condividesse le mie stesse idee in senso musicale, cosa che mi ha stupito abbastanza. Per quanto Berlino sia così grande e piena dei musicisti più disparati, certi stili sono predominanti in modo quasi schiacciante e se ti capita di fare qualcosa di diverso sei davvero tagliato fuori.
Come se non bastasse, Berlino è ipersatura di musica dal vivo e la cosa paradossalmente ha conseguenze nefaste per i musicisti: un sacco di locali vogliono offrire musica live ma, allo stesso tempo, non vogliono spendere soldi per un’amplificazione decente o un tecnico del suono. Il pubblico è diventato anche menefreghista e spesso ostile; c’è di buono che se riesci a “domare” un’audience berlinese puoi andare tranquillo dappertutto!
La cosa più buffa in assoluto è che “venire da Berlino” apre più porte in qualunque altra parte del mondo che nella stessa Berlino…

SA. Tu sei molto attiva nei social media, e non li usi semplicemente come uno strumento promozionale ma anche come una sorta di diario pubblico del tuo processo creativo; la maggior parte dei musicisti italiani tuttavia, specie quelli indipendenti, non sembrano ancora aver compreso appieno il vero potenziale dei social network come alternativa ad un’industria discografica ormai marcescente. Hai qualche consiglio da dare in tal senso?

MB. Per come la vedo io l’importante è trovare uno o due social network con cui ci si trova bene e concentrarsi su quelli; prendersi il tempo necessario per capire il modo migliore di usarli ed integrarli nella propria routine giornaliera. È perfettamente inutile pubblicare un post o aggiornare uno status solo immediatamente prima dell’uscita di un disco, o di un concerto: bisogna costruire un rapporto a lungo termine con chi ti segue, e queste cose richiedono tempo.
Il social network che personalmente preferisco è Twitter. È rapido, immediato, versatile; grazie a Twitter mi sono capitate tutta una serie di cose incredibili: dall’essere scoperta e chiamata da Imogen Heap come supporto nei suoi concerti a Berlino, al trovare fans e colleghi musicisti che mi regalano straordinari remix delle mie canzoni; dall’incontrare amici al trovare suggerimenti, ispirazione ed opportunità… anche i miei concerti in Sicilia si sono materializzati tramite Twitter!

SA. E cosa ti aspetti dai tuoi concerti in Sicilia, a proposito?

MB. Un pubblico caloroso, appassionato e coinvolto; e di divertirmi a suonare.

SA. Per concludere, nella tua carriera di musicista fino ad ora qual è la cosa di cui vai più fiera?

MB. Senza dubbio “Minutia”. Quando ho cominciato a comporre l’album non avevo la minima idea se ce l’avrei mai fatta a portarlo a termine. Ho fatto un salto nel vuoto, e lungo il tragitto ho imparato tantissimo. E il risultato finale non è affatto male, se mi consentite: non si direbbe mai che è stato registrato nel mio appartamento, con una tana di coperte (anche piuttosto accogliente…) al posto della cabina insonorizzata!

 


© 2001, 2014 SuccoAcido - All Rights Reserved
Reg. Court of Palermo (Italy) n°21, 19.10.2001
All images, photographs and illustrations are copyright of respective authors.
Copyright in Italy and abroad is held by the publisher Edizioni De Dieux or by freelance contributors. Edizioni De Dieux does not necessarily share the views expressed from respective contributors.

Bibliography, links, notes:

www.madeleinebloom.com

twitter.com/madeleinebloom

Pen: Marc de Dieux

English translation: Nicoleugenia Prezzavento

 

 
 
  Register to post comments 
  Other articles in archive from SuccoAcido 
  Send it to a friend
  Printable version


To subscribe and receive 4 SuccoAcido issues
onpaper >>>

To distribute in your city SuccoAcido onpaper >>>

To submit articles in SuccoAcido magazine >>>

 
............................................................................................
Photo by Susanna Lundgren
............................................................................................
Photo by Susanna Lundgren
............................................................................................
Photo by Susanna Lundgren
............................................................................................
Photo by Susanna Lundgren
............................................................................................
Photo by Susanna Lundgren
............................................................................................
Photo by Susanna Lundgren
............................................................................................
Photo by Susanna Lundgren
............................................................................................
FRIENDS

Your control panel.
 
Old Admin control not available
waiting new website
in the next days...
Please be patience.
It will be available as soon as possibile, thanks.
De Dieux /\ SuccoAcido

SuccoAcido #3 .:. Summer 2013
 
SA onpaper .:. back issues
 

Today's SuccoAcido Users.
 
Today's News.
 
Succoacido Manifesto.
 
SuccoAcido Home Pages.
 

Art >>>

Cinema >>>

Comics >>>

Music >>>

Theatre >>>

Writing >>>

Editorials >>>

Editorials.
 
EDIZIONI DE DIEUX
Today's Links.
 
FRIENDS
SuccoAcido Back Issues.
 
Projects.
 
SuccoAcido Newsletter.
 
SUCCOACIDO COMMUNITY
Contributors.
 
Contacts.
 
Latest SuccoAcido Users.
 
De Dieux/\SuccoAcido records.
 
Stats.
 
today's users
today's page view
view complete stats
BECOME A DISTRIBUTOR
SuccoAcido Social.