May 20 2019 | Last Update on 24/04/2019 14:00:37
Sitemap | Support succoacido.net | Feed Rss |
Sei stato registrato come ospite. ( Accedi | registrati )
Ci sono 0 altri utenti online (-1 registrati, 1 ospite). 
SuccoAcido.net
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Latest | Arts | Environments | Art Places | Art Knowledges | Art Festivals | Reviews | Biblio | Web-Gallery | News | Links
Art - Arts - Article | by luiza samanda turrin in Art - Arts on 07/04/2009 - Comments (0)
 
 
 
Ray Caesar - Mothers, monsters and machines

Ray Caesar is considered one of the key-man of Pop Surrealism, but his collocation in the movement is controversial. The label, on the one hand, fits him like a glove, but on the other hand is a bit reductive. Especially the most used synonym for Pop Surrealism, Lowbrow Art, is not compatible with the highly cultivated references of Caesar’s work.

 
 

Ray Caesar is considered one of the key-man of Pop Surrealism, but his collocation in the movement is controversial. The label, on the one hand, fits him like a glove, but on the other hand is a bit reductive. Especially the most used synonym for Pop Surrealism, Lowbrow Art, is not compatible with the highly cultivated references of Caesar’s work. His quotations disseminated all over his paintings move up and down along the time-line, converging in estranging mixtures, of exquisite post-modernist taste. They range from the putative father of Surrealism, Salvador Dalì, with his swarming ants, crouches and drawers improperly placed on bodies, to Flemish masters, in the hyper-real and adamantine treatment of surfaces, and in the sparkling saturation of basic colours. Then there is the symbolic bestiary of the Gothic Era, with toads, spiders, insects, ravens, fishes and butterflies. We also have the flowery tapestries of Biedermeier (Wallflowers, Blessed, Sleeping by day), the monumental sky-lines of the Decò skyscrapers (The healing light, Incognito), and the Fifties design (Oh Hally Lou!, Trouble-child). Even the figurative taxonomy of his dollies has aesthetic roots in the history of arts, inspired by the blonds of Cranach and their cruel almond-shaped eyes, the algid and beautiful models of Fouquet, and the dark-haired ladies with unkempt eyebrows of Frida Kahlo’s self-portraits. The iconsphere of Caesar also incorporates the history of cinema, quoting the ice-skating-and-mutilation scene of Jane Campion’s film In the cut (The Hall of Ages), the surgery tools with biodroid lines of Cronenberg, the Universal horror movies with Bride, and the Rococo interior design of the sidereal room beyond Jupiter in 2001: a Space Odyssey.
If on one hand Ceasar’s Surrealism is undeniable, for his strong oneiric dimension and the polymorphous erotism of his children-models, Pop Art influence is not recognizable in his work. Caesar doesn’t represent commodities, neither mass-society icons. However, he has some undeniable features which place him in the Pop-Surrealism movement: the bewitched dimension of lost childhood, given by childlike features of his subjects, the fairy-tale atmosphere, and the narrative quality of his works, emphasized by evocative titles, which open up the pictures on transversal meaning horizons. In fact one of his last exhibitions at the Lonsdale Gallery of Toronto was entitled The Tales We Tell.
The attention for dissimilarity is central in low-browers’ poetics, and we can also find it in the bearded woman of The Waiting Wife, in the thoughtful and metaphysical hydrocephalous of The Burden of Her Memories, in the numerous-legged freak of The Widow’s Tea Party, as well as in the romanticized biography of the artist, in which he asserts that he was born half-child and half-dog, and supports this theory with photomontage in Nineteenth-century daguerreotypes style.
The bodies represented by Caesar are often slashed by scars, as the tattooed young girl of Blessed, blessed by a caesarean section or a foetal removal, or the throbbing Bride, waked up by electric jump sparks: she seems to have undergone chemotherapy, and her head is attached to the body with flashy suture stitches. The interest for scars and paramedical equipments reflects the decennial working experience made by Caesar at the Children’s Hospital of Toronto, during which he learned a lot about “cruelties of Man and Nature, but also that Miracles do exist and are often the product of our own actions”. Also the attention for the interior part of bodies arises from the hospital practice. Caesar’s bodies often lose their traditional opaque texture, and show their contents, in transparency. So we have the Queen of Flies, who displays her exploding cardiac muscle, the dark haired lady of Manifestation, with her lymphatic system in sight, the graceful and mutant damsel of Prelude, the skinned freak exposed in a votive aedicule of Silent Whispers. These bodies have been subjected to mutations which reveal themselves especially in limbs, in the tentacular hands, of liquid nature. More evolved, more malleable, more insinuating than those of the current species, and also more ferocious, finely adorned talon-hands. The body often hybrids with the machine: roundish machinery to explore the abysses or Méliès’ moon, china prosthesis, engraved limbs half organic half artificial. Another recurrent theme is motherhood, which is charged with uncanny meanings, connected to erotism and preying (Madre, Trouble-child, Mother-Mantis, Precious, Blessed).
In the last series In The Garden Of Moonlight, which have been displayed lately at the Magda Danysz Gallery in Paris, Caesar represents some feminine while spinning and wrapping the yarn around their monstrous prosthesis. Metatron, a human being transformed in an angel of flame according to the Qabbalah of Hekhalot, becomes a huge mechanical crab spinning a red yarn with its black legs, controlled by a young lady in a Fifties' style. In Descent, a damsel trapped in a crinoline from the Eighteenth Century is floating like a jellyfish towards the ceiling of a submerged theatre, so that it is possible to see the outgrowth of tentacles beneath her skirts. In Mourning Glory there is a girl sleeping in a Rococò room, and in the meanwhile her legs are levitating in the air, maybe for effect of her dream. She has stapled her hair to the pillow to avoid to take off, as if her hair was a butterfly in a reliquary. But maybe she is a vampire, because she is sleeping with her hands crossed on her breast, her lips are red as blood, and she has the same hairstyle of Dracula in Coppola’s movie. Another creature of the night is the bat-girl dressed in a robe à la française of Day-Break. A bit Cinderella, a bit the White Rabbit, for her pocket-watch, she is caught in her crucial moment of terror. Which effects would the light have on her? Will she survive, or is she going to dissolve like a moth attracted by the fire?
If art means creation of virtual worlds, therefore Caesar is a great master. Besides the power of his subliminal narrations, and the mimetic effect of his textures, there is a lot, lot more. Almost a revolution. Because his way of working knocks the bottom out of the picture-window, inwards. Since Caesar uses a 3-D animation software, the result we see is given by a subtraction process. The original pieces have practicable environments, and is possible to turn around the figures as if they are statues. But we can’t see them: the original pieces are locked up in the mathematical dimension of the software, behind a hidden door, in the secret room of Caesar’s computer.

 
Ray Caesar - Madri, mostri e macchine

Ray Caesar è considerato uno degli esponenti di punta del Surrealismo Pop.
Se da un certo punto di vista l’etichetta calza come un guanto, dall’altro canto è riduttiva rispetto alla portata dell’opera di quest’artista canadese. Soprattutto il sinonimo più usato per indicare il movimento pop-surrealista, Lowbrow Art (arte di massa, di basso livello culturale), risulta incompatibile con i coltissimi riferimenti del lavoro di Caesar.

 
 

Ray Caesar è considerato uno degli esponenti di punta del Surrealismo Pop.
Se da un certo punto di vista l’etichetta calza come un guanto, dall’altro canto è riduttiva rispetto alla portata dell’opera di quest’artista canadese. Soprattutto il sinonimo più usato per indicare il movimento pop-surrealista, Lowbrow Art (arte di massa, di basso livello culturale), risulta incompatibile con i coltissimi riferimenti del lavoro di Caesar.
Le citazioni disseminate nei suoi quadri spaziano su e già lungo la china del tempo: dal padre putativo del Surrealismo storico, il Salvador Dalì delle formiche brulicanti, delle stampelle e dei cassetti impropriamente collocati sui corpi, fino ai maestri fiamminghi, che si ritrovano nella trattazione iperreale e adamantina delle superfici lucide e nella saturazione sfavillante dei colori di base.
C’è il bestiario simbolico dell’era gotica, con rospi, ragni, insetti, corvi, pesci e farfalle. Ci sono le tappezzerie fiorite del Biedermeier (Wallflowers, Blessed, Sleeping by day), gli sky-line monumentali dei grattacieli Decò (The healing light, Incognito), e lo sfavillante design anni Cinquanta (Oh Hally Lou!, Trouble-child).
Persino la tassonomia figurativa delle sue pupattole ha radici estetiche nella storia dell’arte: le bionde con gli occhi dal crudele taglio a mandorla di Cranach, le algide e splendide modelle di Fouquet, le more dalle sopracciglia incolte degli autoritratti di Frida Kahlo.
L’iconosfera di Caesar ingloba anche la storia del cinema, con la citazione della scena di pattinaggio con mutilazione del film di Jane Campion In the cut, in The Hall of Ages, gli arnesi chirurgici dalle linee biodroidi di Cronenberg, l’horror della Universal con Bride, per arrivare agli interni rococò della siderale stanza oltre le Colonne d’Ercole di Giove in 2001 Odissea nello spazio.
Se da un lato il Surrealismo di Caesar è innegabile, per la dimensione onirica della sua opera e per l’erotismo polimorfo e potente delle sue modelle-bambine, d’altra parte non è ravvisabile nella sua opera l’influsso della Pop Art.
Caesar non rappresenta merci, né icone della società di massa.
Ma in ogni caso le caratteristiche che lo collocano all’interno del movimento pop-surrealista sono innegabili. La più evidente è l’ atmosfera di infanzia perpetua, data dai tratti infantili dei suoi soggetti e dalle situazioni da fiaba. Un altro importante aspetto che accomuna Ray Caesar alla temperie dei lowbrower è la qualità narrativa delle sue opere, accentuata da titoli evocativi, che le schiudono su orizzonti di significato trasversali. Non per nulla una delle sue ultime mostre, alla Lonsdale Gallery di Toronto, si intitola The Tales We Tell.
L’attenzione per la difformità è centrale nella poetica dei surrealisti pop, e si rintraccia nella donna barbuta di The Waiting Wife, nell’idrocefala pensosa e metafisica di The burden of her Memories, nella freak dalle molteplici gambe di The widow’s tea party, nonché nella biografia romanzata dell’artista, in cui afferma di essere nato mezzo bambino e mezzo cane, e suffraga questa tesi con fotomontaggi in stile dagherrotipo ottocentesco.
I corpi rappresentati da Caesar sono spesso sfregiati da cicatrici. C’è la ragazzina tatuata di Blessed, benedetta non si sa se da un cesareo o un’estirpazione fetale. Oppure la fremente sposa svegliata dalle scariche elettriche di Bride: la sua testa è attaccata al collo da vistosi punti di sutura, e lei sembra reduce da cicli di chemioterapia. L’interesse per gli sfregi e le attrezzature paramediche rispecchia l’esperienza lavorativa decennale che Caesar ebbe al Children’s Hospital di Toronto, durante la quale imparò molto “sulla crudeltà degli uomini e della natura, ma anche sui miracoli, che esistono e che spesso sono il prodotto delle nostre azioni”.
Dalla pratica all’ospedale nasce anche l’attenzione per l’interno dei corpi, che spesso perdono la loro consistenza opaca e mostrano il loro contenuto. Abbiamo la Queen of flies, che esibisce il suo muscolo cardiaco in esplosione; la mora di Manifestation, con il sistema venoso in bella vista; la damigella vezzosa e mutante di Prelude; la freak scorticata ed esposta dentro all’edicola votiva di Silent whispers.
Le mutazioni a cui questi corpi sono stati sottoposti si rivelano soprattutto negli arti, nelle mani. Mani tentacolari, di natura liquida. Più evolute, malleabili, insinuanti di quelle dell’odierna specie, ed anche più feroci. Mani ad artiglio finemente decorate. Nel lavoro di Caesar spesso il corpo si ibrida con le macchine: macchinari tondeggianti per esplorare gli abissi o la luna di Méliès, protesi di porcellana cinese, arti scolpiti a metà strada fra l’organico e l’artificiale.
Un altro motivo ricorrente nella sua opera è quello della maternità, che si carica di significati perturbanti connessi all’erotismo e alla predazione, (Madre, Trouble-Child, Mother Mantis, Precious, Blessed).
Nell’ultima serie In The Garden Of Moonlight, recentemente esposta alla Galleria Madga Danysz di Parigi, Caesar rappresenta alcune figure femminili intente a filare, nell’atto di avviluppare l’ordito intorno alle loro protesi mostruose.
Metatron, essere umano trasformato in angelo di fiamme della Qabbalah degli Hekhalòt, diventa un grosso granchio meccanico governato da una signorina anni Cinquanta, che fila una matassa rossa con le sue zampe nere. In Descent una dama imprigionata in crinoline settecentesche fluttua come una medusa verso il soffitto di un teatro sommerso, in modo da mostrare l’appendice di tentacoli sotto le sue gonne. In Mourning Glory c’è una ragazza che dorme in una camera rococò, e nel mentre le sue gambe levitano nell’aria, forse per effetto del sogno. Per evitare di prendere il volo ha puntato con degli spilli le sue chiome contro il cuscino, come se fossero farfalle in una teca. Ma forse lei è una vampira, perché dorme con le mani incrociate sul petto, ha le labbra rosso sangue, e la stessa acconciatura di Dracula nel film di Coppola. Un’altra creatura notturna è la donna pipistrello vestita in robe à la francaise di Day-break. Un po’ Cenerentola un po’ Bianconiglio, per via dell’orologio da taschino, viene colta nell’attimo di terrore allo spuntare del giorno. Che effetti avrà su di lei la luce? Sopravviverà, o si dissolverà come una falena attirata dal fuoco?
Se arte vuol dire creazione di mondi virtuali, allora Ray Caesar è sommo maestro. Oltre alla potenza magica delle sue narrazioni subliminali, e all’effetto mimetico delle sue superfici, c’è molto, molto di più. Quasi una rivoluzione. Perché il suo modo di lavorare sfonda il manufatto canonico del quadro-finestra verso l’interno. Dato che l’artista fa uso di un software per l’animazione in 3D, il risultato che noi vediamo è dato da un processo di sottrazione. I pezzi originali hanno ambienti percorribili, e si può girare intorno alle figure come se fossero statue. Ma noi non possiamo vederli, perché gli originali sono reclusi nella dimensione matematica del software, oltre a una porta nascosta, nella stanza segreta all’interno del computer di Caesar.

 


© 2001, 2014 SuccoAcido - All Rights Reserved
Reg. Court of Palermo (Italy) n°21, 19.10.2001
All images, photographs and illustrations are copyright of respective authors.
Copyright in Italy and abroad is held by the publisher Edizioni De Dieux or by freelance contributors. Edizioni De Dieux does not necessarily share the views expressed from respective contributors.

Bibliography, links, notes:

Pen: Luiza S. Kainowska
English Version: Luiza S. Kainowska, editing of Rachele Cinarelli.
Photos: Courtesy of www.raycaesar.com
Link: www.raycaesar.com/

 
 
  Register to post comments 
  Other articles in archive from luiza samanda turrin 
  Send it to a friend
  Printable version


To subscribe and receive 4 SuccoAcido issues
onpaper >>>

To distribute in your city SuccoAcido onpaper >>>

To submit articles in SuccoAcido magazine >>>

 
Blessed
............................................................................................
Madre
............................................................................................
Sleeping by day
............................................................................................
Oh Hally Lou!
............................................................................................
The Hall of Ages
............................................................................................
Descent
............................................................................................
Day-break
............................................................................................
Guardian
............................................................................................
Mourning Glory
............................................................................................
Bride
............................................................................................
Paternal Secrets
FRIENDS

Your control panel.
 
Old Admin control not available
waiting new website
in the next days...
Please be patience.
It will be available as soon as possibile, thanks.
De Dieux /\ SuccoAcido

SuccoAcido #3 .:. Summer 2013
 
SA onpaper .:. back issues
 

Today's SuccoAcido Users.
 
Today's News.
 
Succoacido Manifesto.
 
SuccoAcido Home Pages.
 

Art >>>

Cinema >>>

Comics >>>

Music >>>

Theatre >>>

Writing >>>

Editorials >>>

Editorials.
 
EDIZIONI DE DIEUX
Today's Links.
 
FRIENDS
SuccoAcido Back Issues.
 
Projects.
 
SuccoAcido Newsletter.
 
SUCCOACIDO COMMUNITY
Contributors.
 
Contacts.
 
Latest SuccoAcido Users.
 
De Dieux/\SuccoAcido records.
 
Stats.
 
today's users
today's page view
view complete stats
BECOME A DISTRIBUTOR
SuccoAcido Social.